Drawing Dinosaurs
lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

You saw the first draft, now take a look at the full teaser poster for dinostuck's top secret project! Here you see not a bunch of random dinosaurs, but those from the Dinosaur Park fauna. More posters are coming soon so stay tuned!
UPDATE: Added quills to the Stegoceras and gave Chasmosaurus a bit more fluff as per request of raptorcivilization and dinostuck! Thanks for your input!

lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

You saw the first draft, now take a look at the full teaser poster for dinostuck's top secret project! Here you see not a bunch of random dinosaurs, but those from the Dinosaur Park fauna. More posters are coming soon so stay tuned!

UPDATE: Added quills to the Stegoceras and gave Chasmosaurus a bit more fluff as per request of raptorcivilization and dinostuck! Thanks for your input!

assuming-dinosaur:

kenbrasai:

assuming-dinosaur:

So is today “feathered ornithischians everywhere day” or something? Am I ever going to see a scaly dinosaur again?

No, Jurassic Park 3 is still coming out, deviantart and tumblr are still ejaculating scaly ornithomimids, and bitches whining about feathered dinosaurs means that scalies will unfortunately survive.

Allow me to rephrase that. Will I ever see a scaly dinosaur again other than the awesomebro versions?

YOU CALLED?

lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

askedmontonia:

lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

radicalestes:

jamietheignorantamerican:

WHY DOES NO ONE TALK ABOUT THE QUETZALCOATLUS?!

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I MEAN, JESUS F. CHRIST.

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PTERODACTYLS AIN’T SHIT NEXT TO THESE MOTHER FUCKERS. QUETZALCOATLUS FUCKING ATE BABY DINOSAURS FOR BRUNCH.

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LITTLE-FOOT, NOOOO!!!

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JUST IMAGINE…

Dear jamietheignorantamerican, there are more of them. They are called azhdarchids.

Someone mentioned pterodactyls being seemingly insignificant next to azhdarchids…but azhdarchids are the largest of the “pterodactyls,” or, indeed, the pterosaurs.

Oh yeah, I was going to point that out, that is a legitimate palaeofail unless pterodactyl is referring to Pterodactylus and similarly sized pterosaurs, which would work.

The picture above shows an azhdarchid compared to a Pteranodon, which as we all know is the stock-pterosaur in media and is often simply labelled as “pterodactyl”.

I dare say the situation has gotten so bad that “pterodactyl” is starting to usurp the name Pteranodon.

dinodorks:

dinodorks:

drawingdinosaurs:

lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

skeletaldrawing:

Funny that this would break embargo mere minutes after my response to a question about dinofuzz. Definitely strengthens the idea that dinosaurs (and maybe the common ancestor of pterosaurs and dinosaurs) were primitively fuzzy.

Whoa, that was fast.

Kulindadromeus is an ornithopod, correct? Just fuzzy?

The paper’s abstract describes it as a “basal neornithischian”, so it’s not quite as derived as ornithopods.

!!!!!!!!
- Mod Rainfrogs

I KNEW IT

Update:

Going through the supplementary information, the phylogenetic analysis places Kulindadromeus as a sister clade to cerapoda on the cladograms.

lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

skeletaldrawing:

Funny that this would break embargo mere minutes after my response to a question about dinofuzz. Definitely strengthens the idea that dinosaurs (and maybe the common ancestor of pterosaurs and dinosaurs) were primitively fuzzy.

Whoa, that was fast.

Kulindadromeus is an ornithopod, correct? Just fuzzy?

The paper’s abstract describes it as a “basal neornithischian”, so it’s not quite as derived as ornithopods.

skeletaldrawing:

Funny that this would break embargo mere minutes after my response to a question about dinofuzz. Definitely strengthens the idea that dinosaurs (and maybe the common ancestor of pterosaurs and dinosaurs) were primitively fuzzy.

tyrannosaurslair:

Abstract

The skeletal record of tyrannosaurids is well-documented, whereas their footprint record is surprisingly sparse. There are only a few isolated footprints attributed to tyrannosaurids and, hitherto, no reported trackways. We report the world’s first trackways attributable to tyrannosaurids, and describe a new ichnotaxon attributable to tyrannosaurids. These trackways are from the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian - Maastrichtian) of northeastern British Columbia, Canada. One trackway consists of three tridactyl footprints, and two adjacent trackways consist of two footprints each. All three trackways show animals bearing southeast within an 8.5 meter-wide corridor. Similarities in depth and preservation of the tyrannosaurid tracks indicate that these three trackways were made by track-makers walking concurrently in the same direction. These trackways add significantly to previous osteology-based hypotheses of locomotion and behavior in Tyrannosauridae by providing ichnologic support for gregariousness in tyrannosaurids, and the first record of the walking gait of tyrannosaurids.

Personal highlights from this paper:

  • The trackmakers are each estimated to be 26, 29 and 25 years old, which would make this a group of adult animals, not just juveniles congregating for protection.
  • The presence of other tracks from other species in disparate locations and moving in different directions indicates that the tyrannosaurids were walking together by choice, not forced in the same direction by terrain (e.g. by a cliff or shoreline).
  • One of the trackmakers appears to have had its second toe on its left foot traumatically amputated somehow. The injury doesn’t appear to have impaired movement, although the positioning of the right foot is consistent with compensating for such an injury.

The toe injury is especially intriguing for me. Knowing tyrannosaurids’ track record for intraspecific injuries, I wouldn’t be surprised if the toe had been bitten off by another tyrannosaurid, perhaps even by one of the ones it had been travelling with!

lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

dinodorks:

lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

dinodorks:

Carolina Parakeet by windfalcon

Wait, it’s not extinct?

The Carolina Parakeet is indeed extinct;
The very last two birds were known as Lady Jane (a female) and Incas (a male), the pair lived at the Cincinnati Zoo in Cincinnati, Ohio. Lady Jane passed away in I believe 1917 whilst her male counterpart, the last Carolina Parakeet, died a year later on February 21, 1918. Also, the last wild bird was killed in 1904 in Florida; Okeechobee County to be specific.
Of course there have been supposed sightings and there’s always that chance that there are some birds still hiding out somewhere, but officially the species is listed as extinct.
- Leopard

Really? Then…

Isn’t this a pair of them in the zoo? I’m confused.

Those are mounted specimens at Museum Wiesbaden in Germany.

lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

dinodorks:

lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

dinodorks:

Carolina Parakeet by windfalcon

Wait, it’s not extinct?

The Carolina Parakeet is indeed extinct;

The very last two birds were known as Lady Jane (a female) and Incas (a male), the pair lived at the Cincinnati Zoo in Cincinnati, Ohio. Lady Jane passed away in I believe 1917 whilst her male counterpart, the last Carolina Parakeet, died a year later on February 21, 1918. Also, the last wild bird was killed in 1904 in Florida; Okeechobee County to be specific.

Of course there have been supposed sightings and there’s always that chance that there are some birds still hiding out somewhere, but officially the species is listed as extinct.

- Leopard

Really? Then…

Isn’t this a pair of them in the zoo? I’m confused.

Those are mounted specimens at Museum Wiesbaden in Germany.

drawingdinosaurs:

Behold, a bearded dragon…dragon.
I shouldn’t be doodling at 3am.


I don’t know how to draw fire.

drawingdinosaurs:

Behold, a bearded dragon…dragon.

I shouldn’t be doodling at 3am.

I don’t know how to draw fire.

Behold, a bearded dragon…dragon.
I shouldn’t be doodling at 3am.

Behold, a bearded dragon…dragon.

I shouldn’t be doodling at 3am.