Drawing Dinosaurs
lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

Sketch I drew today of the by now world-famous Ikrandraco avatar.Anatomy and posture based off the original reconstruction, coloration pattern from Avatar. 
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lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

Sketch I drew today of the by now world-famous Ikrandraco avatar.Anatomy and posture based off the original reconstruction, coloration pattern from Avatar. 

Read More

a-dinosaur-a-day:

image

Source: http://www.theguardian.com/science/2013/nov/06/lythronax-argestes-tyrannosaurs

Name: Lythronax argestes

Name Meaning: Clearing Gore King

First Described: 2013

Described By: Loewen et al.

Classification: Dinosauria, Saurischia, Theropoda, Neotheropoda, Averostra,…

No-one with an interest in Mesozoic reptiles will have missed the week of controversy following Ibrahim et al.’s (2014) new reconstruction of Spinosaurus. The most important debate has focused on the allegedly reduced Spinosaurus hindlimbs, which are integral to the proposed locomotor and lifestyle hypotheses proposed for the ‘new look’ animal, but also difficult to reconcile with presented data. Scott Hartman, who’s no stranger to producing high-quality skeletal reconstructions, blew this whistle first when he found the reconstructed proportions of the Spinosaurus neotype specimen - a series of vertebrae and hindlimb elements - were questionably scaled against measurements of the bones themselves. Lead author of the Spinosaurus study, Nizar Ibrahim, publicly responded and suggested that the measuring landmarks Scott used in comparing vertebral and hindlimb elements may be wrong. When reviewing the controversy before the weekend, I attempted my own scaling effort, using Nizar’s suggested landmarks, but ended up replicating Scott’s results almost exactly. I concluded “[s]omething - the original measurements of the specimen or the reconstruction - just doesn’t add up, and I suspect the latter, as I figure someone would have owned up to and corrected simple numerical errors in the paper by now.”

It turns out that I’ve got to eat a few of those words.

Tl;dr, Nizar Ibrahim and Simone Maganuco, two authors from the new Spinosaurus paper, have provided Mark Witton with an explanation to the hindlimb-scale controversy, which they have kindly allowed him to share publicly. 

Stumpy-legged Spinosaurus looks to be genuine, folks.

lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

sciencetoastudent:

sedimentarywatson:

sciencetoastudent:

sciencetoastudent:

bone-hunter:

Spinosaurus VS Onchopristis & Carcharodontosaurus VS Ouranosaurus

Just like that memorable scene in the decent-but-not-amazing film Planet Dinosaur.

More Spinosaurus, this time some proof that the fish idea isn’t new (as the media seems to think).  Check out this video here.

Can you imagine if we drew our area like we draw dinosaurs like. A grizzly bear catching a fish in the foreground while a puma devours an elk in the background

You know, that’s a very good point, I see so much paleoart that has a dozen dinosaurs in it…I get it, it’s an artistic representation, and I love good paleoart regardless, but sometimes I have to agree with you!

Let’s try the cluttering gradient with different palaeoartists. Mark Witton, for example:
_

Out of all those, personally I think only the first one is in palaeoartismo territory.
It’s not uncommon for several species to gather at a carcass when scavenging, so dead-darcho’s okay. The herd of Rukwatitan is sound for obvious reasons, and the Nyasasaurus is intended to be associated with the rhynchosaurs:

 Rather than simply including a bunch of Stenaulorhynchus in the distance however, we thought it would be cool to have the Nyasasaurus following a trail of destructive rhynchosaur foraging. Rhynchosaurs are noted for their adaptations for scratch digging with their hindlimbs, which may have been used to unearth roots, tubers or other food (Benton 1983, 1990) . In this image, several shallow excavations have been made by a troop of Stenaulorhynchus in their quest for food, which the Nyasasaurus is picking over to nab exhumed invertebrates and nutritious plant matter left behind. (X)

Not to be knocking on Mohamad Haghani’s work or anything, it’s a gorgeous piece of palaeoart, after all.

lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

sciencetoastudent:

sedimentarywatson:

sciencetoastudent:

sciencetoastudent:

bone-hunter:

  • Spinosaurus VS Onchopristis & Carcharodontosaurus VS Ouranosaurus

Just like that memorable scene in the decent-but-not-amazing film Planet Dinosaur.

More Spinosaurus, this time some proof that the fish idea isn’t new (as the media seems to think).  Check out this video here.

Can you imagine if we drew our area like we draw dinosaurs like. A grizzly bear catching a fish in the foreground while a puma devours an elk in the background

You know, that’s a very good point, I see so much paleoart that has a dozen dinosaurs in it…I get it, it’s an artistic representation, and I love good paleoart regardless, but sometimes I have to agree with you!

Let’s try the cluttering gradient with different palaeoartists. Mark Witton, for example:

_

Out of all those, personally I think only the first one is in palaeoartismo territory.

It’s not uncommon for several species to gather at a carcass when scavenging, so dead-darcho’s okay. The herd of Rukwatitan is sound for obvious reasons, and the Nyasasaurus is intended to be associated with the rhynchosaurs:

 Rather than simply including a bunch of Stenaulorhynchus in the distance however, we thought it would be cool to have the Nyasasaurus following a trail of destructive rhynchosaur foraging. Rhynchosaurs are noted for their adaptations for scratch digging with their hindlimbs, which may have been used to unearth roots, tubers or other food (Benton 1983, 1990) . In this image, several shallow excavations have been made by a troop of Stenaulorhynchus in their quest for food, which the Nyasasaurus is picking over to nab exhumed invertebrates and nutritious plant matter left behind. (X)

Not to be knocking on Mohamad Haghani’s work or anything, it’s a gorgeous piece of palaeoart, after all.

If you’re having trouble envisioning Ibrahim and Sereno’s Spinosaurus as a biped, even with the updated limb proportions, I direct you to the above video about pangolins.

Pangolins are (as far as I’m aware) the only mammals with a theropod bauplan, that is, walking on two legs with a horizontal body posture. Mammal hips aren’t designed for this sort of posture though, but pangolins has to walk like that because of their specialised forelimbs, so they’ve got a bit of an awkward, hobbling walk.

The long, low body, short legs and even the arched back of pangolins reminds me a fair bit of Spinosaurus, the proportions don’t seem that far off IMO. I could quite easily envision Spinosaurus walking bipedally like this, with its hands only just off the ground and with short, quick steps.

Rather suits it, I think.

drawingdinosaurs:

A hastily drawn Spinosaurus based on the skeleton seen here, supposedly based on new material.
The osteoderms are totally not plagiarised from the main image and are there because osteoderms are cool.

Bringing this back because of some relevance (can’t imagine what).
New and improved version coming soon (possibly).

drawingdinosaurs:

A hastily drawn Spinosaurus based on the skeleton seen here, supposedly based on new material.

The osteoderms are totally not plagiarised from the main image and are there because osteoderms are cool.

Bringing this back because of some relevance (can’t imagine what).

New and improved version coming soon (possibly).

socialjusticekoolaid:

On the one-month anniversary of Michael Brown’s death, his family gathered at the Ferguson Police Department to again demand justice for his murder. Where is Darren Wilson, and why has he still not been arrested? #farfromover #staywoke

christopher-whitelaw:

spoopy mingos

Unbelievable.
They missed out on the chance to call them “flaminghouls”.

christopher-whitelaw:

spoopy mingos

Unbelievable.

They missed out on the chance to call them “flaminghouls”.

dinodorks:

lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

Hey there folks, I saw this palaeontology book in a news photo, and I have no idea what it is. Can anyone identify it?

Thanks!
2211 is a triangular number.

Did you see this photo in a newspaper by any chance? Because seeing as we’re from the same area I might be able to find a copy of said newspaper and identify the book.
My best guess as of right now though;The art style and seemingly outdated looking Dinosaurs lead me to believe this is definitely an older book, possibly a sticker book? It’s really hard to tell as the image is rather small/blurry.
- Leopard

Looks like “100 things you should know about DINOSAURS”:

Specifically these two pages:

dinodorks:

lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

Hey there folks, I saw this palaeontology book in a news photo, and I have no idea what it is. Can anyone identify it?

Thanks!

2211 is a triangular number.

Did you see this photo in a newspaper by any chance? Because seeing as we’re from the same area I might be able to find a copy of said newspaper and identify the book.

My best guess as of right now though;
The art style and seemingly outdated looking Dinosaurs lead me to believe this is definitely an older book, possibly a sticker book? It’s really hard to tell as the image is rather small/blurry.

- Leopard

Looks like “100 things you should know about DINOSAURS”:

Specifically these two pages:

seegercove:

Saskatchewan Province, Canada

The Judith River Formation

65 million years ago



A cold wind whipped down from the snowcapped mountains that loomed over Judith River. The sudden gust caught the feathery Atrociraptor locals by surprise- their winter down had all but molted away, leaving them only with a thin coat of spotted, earthy summer fluff that offered no protection from the chill.

The whole pack took notice. The wind hadn’t come on its own- it carried the scent of mega-herbivores. Namely, Blunt’s herd of ornery Triceratops, and their duck-billed Edmontosaur companions.

To their surprise, Blunt’s rank stench wasn’t present amidst the potpourri of stenches produced by his herd. His had always been the strongest. The Atrociraptors managed to discern, by scent alone, how close the massive, beaked temper tantrums were, ballparked it and skeedaddled once they realized that it didn’t matter- any distance was too close when Triceratops were on the move.

In fact, they were still quite close. Their huge, meaty hooves slammed into the ground, their stubby elephant toes nearly stiff with cold. It had taken them over a week to find their way out of the whipping winds of the frozen mountain peaks, and as they arrived, their numbed extremities woke back up with pins and needles. Worse yet, they’d worked up an appetite. No being that valued its life would have been crazy enough to block their paths, lest they become an ingredient in the world’s first shish kebabs.

The prehistoric bulldozers plowed forward with little regard for anything else, led by the herd’s new matriarch, Edith, whose horns were the reason why Blunt had been… shall we say, let go.

It was the first time the herd had felt any emotion remotely close to “overjoyed” in a long time. The frozen cliffs were behind them, thanks in no small part to a mix of Edith’s superior tracking and the keen snoots of their Edmontosaur traveling companions. Let’s hear it for the buddy system!

They found themselves in a genuine Canadian shield- a pristine boreal forest grown over solid shale terra firma that may have been old as life itself. The massive conifers wrapped around a glistening lake that shimmered like diamonds in the afternoon sun. Healthy green patches of ferns covered the forest floor, taunting their growling stomachs as they lumbered towards them. Their beaks hung open and they salivated like St. Bernards.

Blunt would have driven them through the woods without stopping until they got back to Hell Creek, but nowadays, the only show he was running was the frozen foods section back in the peaks. Edith, on the other hoof, had this thing called a soul, and was in no hurry to return. Herds marched on their stomachs, and the herd was in desperate need of a rest stop.

There was so much greenery. Never once had Blunt given them a chance to stop and enjoy it. Their parrotlike beaks chopped through the ferns like hedge clippers. Mothers regurgitated plant matter for their cubs before tending to themselves. Edith looked upon them with pride in her eyes. Her friends. Her babies. All safe. No more strife.

The warm, solid shale under her toes warmed them from the bitter cold. She uprooted a beakful of fern and shrub and gazed at the sky as she chewed. A flock of migrating pterosaurs soared overhead, their broad, majestic wings fluttering slightly to maintain altitude. She could see their cheese-wedge shaped stork bills sticking out from their long, skinny necks. They were probably ahzdarchids, heading north to Alaska to catch the salmon run.

She sighed and lied down on the solid rock heating pad under her, warmed from the afternoon sun. Trike cubs and fledgling Edmontosaurs gallivanted and splashed about the lake with each other, now thick as thieves after their ordeal in the mountains. The scent of local carnivores (Atrociraptors, northern Troodon, and a Saskatchewanian breed of T. rex) was mixed with a scent of fear, or uncertainty.  They were there, hiding in the forests and keeping their heads low- still thrown by the triceratops’ late arrival and their refusal to leave.

Forget the migration. After three decades of being pushed ahead by their mutually despised dictator, Edith had an unshakable urge to stick around and relax. Hell Creek wasn’t going anywhere. Evidently, killing Blunt and ending his reign wasn’t enough for Edith. Ever the revolutionary, she had just invented vacations.
But as they basked in the sun on their well-deserved hiatus, things began to unravel in Hell Creek. The Triceratops couldn’t possibly understand just how pivotal a cog they were in the ecological machine back home. For in their absence, it wasn’t long before the carnivores realized that there were no horns or shields to keep them away from the weaker prey species that they had salivated over for years.
The name Hell Creek was soon to become much more literal.

seegercove:

Saskatchewan Province, Canada
The Judith River Formation
65 million years ago
A cold wind whipped down from the snowcapped mountains that loomed over Judith River. The sudden gust caught the feathery Atrociraptor locals by surprise- their winter down had all but molted away, leaving them only with a thin coat of spotted, earthy summer fluff that offered no protection from the chill.
The whole pack took notice. The wind hadn’t come on its own- it carried the scent of mega-herbivores. Namely, Blunt’s herd of ornery Triceratops, and their duck-billed Edmontosaur companions.
To their surprise, Blunt’s rank stench wasn’t present amidst the potpourri of stenches produced by his herd. His had always been the strongest. The Atrociraptors managed to discern, by scent alone, how close the massive, beaked temper tantrums were, ballparked it and skeedaddled once they realized that it didn’t matter- any distance was too close when Triceratops were on the move.
In fact, they were still quite close. Their huge, meaty hooves slammed into the ground, their stubby elephant toes nearly stiff with cold. It had taken them over a week to find their way out of the whipping winds of the frozen mountain peaks, and as they arrived, their numbed extremities woke back up with pins and needles. Worse yet, they’d worked up an appetite. No being that valued its life would have been crazy enough to block their paths, lest they become an ingredient in the world’s first shish kebabs.
The prehistoric bulldozers plowed forward with little regard for anything else, led by the herd’s new matriarch, Edith, whose horns were the reason why Blunt had been… shall we say, let go.
It was the first time the herd had felt any emotion remotely close to “overjoyed” in a long time. The frozen cliffs were behind them, thanks in no small part to a mix of Edith’s superior tracking and the keen snoots of their Edmontosaur traveling companions. Let’s hear it for the buddy system!
They found themselves in a genuine Canadian shield- a pristine boreal forest grown over solid shale terra firma that may have been old as life itself. The massive conifers wrapped around a glistening lake that shimmered like diamonds in the afternoon sun. Healthy green patches of ferns covered the forest floor, taunting their growling stomachs as they lumbered towards them. Their beaks hung open and they salivated like St. Bernards.
Blunt would have driven them through the woods without stopping until they got back to Hell Creek, but nowadays, the only show he was running was the frozen foods section back in the peaks. Edith, on the other hoof, had this thing called a soul, and was in no hurry to return. Herds marched on their stomachs, and the herd was in desperate need of a rest stop.
There was so much greenery. Never once had Blunt given them a chance to stop and enjoy it. Their parrotlike beaks chopped through the ferns like hedge clippers. Mothers regurgitated plant matter for their cubs before tending to themselves. Edith looked upon them with pride in her eyes. Her friends. Her babies. All safe. No more strife.
The warm, solid shale under her toes warmed them from the bitter cold. She uprooted a beakful of fern and shrub and gazed at the sky as she chewed. A flock of migrating pterosaurs soared overhead, their broad, majestic wings fluttering slightly to maintain altitude. She could see their cheese-wedge shaped stork bills sticking out from their long, skinny necks. They were probably ahzdarchids, heading north to Alaska to catch the salmon run.
She sighed and lied down on the solid rock heating pad under her, warmed from the afternoon sun. Trike cubs and fledgling Edmontosaurs gallivanted and splashed about the lake with each other, now thick as thieves after their ordeal in the mountains. The scent of local carnivores (Atrociraptors, northern Troodon, and a Saskatchewanian breed of T. rex) was mixed with a scent of fear, or uncertainty.  They were there, hiding in the forests and keeping their heads low- still thrown by the triceratops’ late arrival and their refusal to leave.
Forget the migration. After three decades of being pushed ahead by their mutually despised dictator, Edith had an unshakable urge to stick around and relax. Hell Creek wasn’t going anywhere.

Evidently, killing Blunt and ending his reign wasn’t enough for Edith. Ever the revolutionary, she had just invented vacations.
But as they basked in the sun on their well-deserved hiatus, things began to unravel in Hell Creek. The Triceratops couldn’t possibly understand just how pivotal a cog they were in the ecological machine back home. For in their absence, it wasn’t long before the carnivores realized that there were no horns or shields to keep them away from the weaker prey species that they had salivated over for years.
The name Hell Creek was soon to become much more literal.